FAQs

  • How do I know if I have asbestos in my home?
    • The only way to be sure whether a material contains asbestos is to have it tested by a qualified laboratory.  The EPA recommends testing if the suspect materials are damaged or if you are planning a renovation.  Samples should be taken by a properly trained and accredited asbestos professional (inspector).
  • What are the health risks if I have asbestos in my home, building, apartment, school, or workplace?
    • Asbestos in good condition and left undisturbed is unlikely to present a health risk.  The risks from asbestos come when it is damaged or disturbed where asbestos fibers become airborne and can be inhaled.  Managing asbestos in place and maintaining it in good repair is often the best approach.
  • I use/used vermiculite to enhance my potting soil.  Should I be concerned?
    • The EPA's investigation into these products indicates that consumers face only a minimal health risk from using vermiculite products at home or in their gardens.
  • I am planning to remodel my home.  Do I need to be concerned about asbestos in the building materials?
    • It is not possible for you to tell whether a material in your home contains asbestos simply by looking at it.  If you suspect a material within your home might contain asbestos (constructed before 1985), the EPA recommends you have it sampled by a properly trained and accredited asbestos professional (inspector).
  • How do I find out if my child's school has asbestos in it?
    • The Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Rule, pursuant to the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires schools to make their asbestos management plans available to the public, including parents, within five (5) working days of the request.  The asbestos management plan should discuss the location and type of asbestos-containing materials and any preventative measures or response actions taken in your child's school.  You can also contact the school's AHERA Designated Person directly for more information, or if you have specific questions about asbestos in your child's school.  The AHERA Designated Person's name and contact information appears in the management plan.
  • Is it dangerous to have asbestos containing material in my home, school, or workplace?
    • Not necessarily.  Undamaged asbestos properly maintained in place poses little health risk.  However, it is important the asbestos-containing materials remain intact.  Asbestos can pose a health hazard when it is disturbed and asbestos fibers become airborne where they can be inhaled.  Undamaged non-friable asbestos is best left undisturbed and managed in place.  If done improperly, removing asbestos has the potential to create a greater health risk than leaving it undisturbed.
  • Is exposure to mold dangerous?
    • Mold growth can not only lead to structural damage to your home (like sagging floors), but it can also adversely affect your health.  You can be exposed to mold by touching moldy materials, eating moldy food, and breathing in microscopic mold spores in the air.  You can inhale over a half million spored per minute without evening knowing it.  Mold allergy symptoms may include skin rash, runny nose, irritated eyes, cough, congestion, and aggravation of asthma. (taken from www.achooallergy.com) 

Frequently Asked Questions.
Frequently Asked Questions.